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Thread: NSX Health Check Service

  1. #431

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    Than pretty much sums it up lol

    I also never tried the damperless joint with OEM pedal, installed the 2 parts at the same time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaz-kzukNA1 View Post
    Hi, Mark.

    Itís the combination of the damper less joint and the Type-R pedal.

    Please refer to the next question onwards for the effect of pedal.

    While the damper will eliminate the vibration/noise through the clutch pedal from Gbox, it changes the actual bite point depending on how you depressed the pedal.

    Also, the initial movement of the pedal travel is absorbed by the damper that it will require longer pedal stroke to disengage the clutch.



    If the initial pedal height and stroke is the same between standard (dampened joint + normal pedal) and Type-R (damper less joint + Type-R pedal) setup, then you are correct.

    However, with Type-R setup, there is no damper in the hydraulic system and thus, the clutch is disengaged with shorter pedal stroke.

    Addition to this and for better access, Type-R pedal is using lower initial pedal height.
    So, you can control the clutch with shorter pedal stroke and less movement of your foot from the foot-rest position comapred to the standard setup.
    This will allow you the quicker clutch pedal action.



    I never installed just the damper less joint without the Type-R clutch pedal but if you look at the above points, you will know that there is no point in doing so. Similar to your comment above, most of the pedal stroke is wasted if you stayed with the standard pedal.

    By the way, as you can imagine, it is not good to use just the Type-R pedal with standard dampened joint. Depending on the way you depress the pedal, there is a small chance that you may not fully disengage the clutch before shifting.


    The hydraulic system components such as clutch master/slave/hose/pipe and most of the release folk components are the same between single and twin type clutch so you can use this setup on both clutch type.

    Kaz
    ďOnce you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.Ē

    後は、残っているものに関係なく、不可能なことを排除する方法 ありそうもない、真実でなければなりません。

  2. #432

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    Quote Originally Posted by AR View Post
    Well Kaz I have my RPS/SOS Twin Carbon here and I am hoping one day to get it done by you if possible. I can tell you that it looks like a sperb piece of engineering.
    I have one of those waiting in the wings as well. Looks too nice to fit doesn't it

    When I get around to fitting it I'm tempted to complement it with a solid crank pulley, in place of the harmonic balancer, to take better advantage of the lightened reciprocating mass.

    Mark
    The older I get, the faster I was

  3. #433

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaz-kzukNA1 View Post
    Hi, Mark.

    Itís the combination of the damper less joint and the Type-R pedal.

    Please refer to the next question onwards for the effect of pedal.

    While the damper will eliminate the vibration/noise through the clutch pedal from Gbox, it changes the actual bite point depending on how you depressed the pedal.

    Also, the initial movement of the pedal travel is absorbed by the damper that it will require longer pedal stroke to disengage the clutch.



    If the initial pedal height and stroke is the same between standard (dampened joint + normal pedal) and Type-R (damper less joint + Type-R pedal) setup, then you are correct.

    However, with Type-R setup, there is no damper in the hydraulic system and thus, the clutch is disengaged with shorter pedal stroke.

    Addition to this and for better access, Type-R pedal is using lower initial pedal height.
    So, you can control the clutch with shorter pedal stroke and less movement of your foot from the foot-rest position comapred to the standard setup.
    This will allow you the quicker clutch pedal action.



    I never installed just the damper less joint without the Type-R clutch pedal but if you look at the above points, you will know that there is no point in doing so. Similar to your comment above, most of the pedal stroke is wasted if you stayed with the standard pedal.

    By the way, as you can imagine, it is not good to use just the Type-R pedal with standard dampened joint. Depending on the way you depress the pedal, there is a small chance that you may not fully disengage the clutch before shifting.


    The hydraulic system components such as clutch master/slave/hose/pipe and most of the release folk components are the same between single and twin type clutch so you can use this setup on both clutch type.

    Kaz

    Thank you for the clarification Kaz, as ever perfectly explained

    I would however contend that with the R pedal being simply a different angle, the distance of the throw (stroke?) will be the same (as the standard pedal with damper less joint) it's the start point i.e. pedal height that changes. The available stoke may be shorter with the R pedal, because it might hit floor sooner, but the stroke required to fully disengage the clutch will be the same.

    Is the R pedal angle primarily different to ensure that at rest the position (height) is aligned with the brake pedal? I wonder how much higher the standard pedal would sit.

    I'm sure this sounds like nit picking but I've driven a few cars with low clutch pedal engagement/bite point and I really don't like them.

    I guess the best option would be for me to try the damper less joint first and add the R pedal if it feels wrong i.e. too high.

    Cheers

    Mark
    The older I get, the faster I was

  4. #434
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    Default Timing Belt, Water Pump, Valve clearance, Health Check, etc.

    Another owner visited my place to go through the TB, WP, Valve clearance and once a year Health Check services.

    This is the JDM early type Auto with nice body kits.
    I always enjoy driving this AT model.

    Up to the VTEC zone, there is not much difference between AT and MT models and when we tested lots of owners on the same day at the same track, most of the AT model owners were more consistent than the MT owners from the lap time point of view.

    Particularly, I like the extra push from the AT torque converter from standstill.


    I used to track AT models (not NSX) with more than 550hp and 330hp every two weeks or sometimes every week all over the world and as the AT brain was cleaver enough, I didnít bother using the paddle shift.
    If you have big enough capacity on the torque converter, you can really enjoy driving powerful AT models without any AT slip on shifting.



    For our NSX, especially if you have later AT version with F-matic, you wonít be disappointed if you know how to drive AT models fast and also thanks to the revised gear ratio and the final ratio.
    I didnít like the position of F-matic lever at the side of steering column but still, you can drive fast enough using the AT gear selector manually.



    Fortunately, the owner had the Japanese service documents and I translated them into English in the past.

    When I looked at the car, I found that there was no water pump seeping tube sticking out from the timing belt cover which suggested that the water pump was never replaced in the past.

    Addition to this, from the service history in Japan and UK, it looked like the timing belt was never replaced for about 18 years. The mileage was well below the JDM TB service schedule when it was exported to UK and the owner covered only low mileage since then.


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    During the process, one of the major task would be removing the crank pulley bolt. If it was removed and greased peoperly in the past, it would be easy task but based on the service history, it looked as if it was never removed. So, before carrying out any work, I decided to try removing the bolt and then tighten it back to the specified torque.

    As this is the AT model, it requires different crank pulley attachement tool.

    As always, I had to use extra long pipe to get more power to loosen the bolt.


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    Before draining the coolant, it is important to set the water/coolant valve to max temperature.

    Preparation for the compression check before removing lots of parts.
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    Even the car was rarely driven in the rain, the rear bank IGN coils showed some rust/corrosion. There was no sign of misfire so it would be fine by just smoothing them out for the time being but something to be replaced in the future.

    Front bank ones were all fine.

  5. #435
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    Default

    OEM spark plugs are fine for about 60K miles. However, for most of our NSX, you will find some heavy corrosion at the climping area around the insulator and bolt body and thus, you may require to replace them earlier than the service schedule.

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    Sparkplug terminal chip looked very clean and light brown suggesting good spark but I didn't like lots of corrosion at the insulator above the bolt body.On our NSX, it is the quite common failure reason for old spark plugs even before reaching the 60K miles interval.
    Because of this, I'm going to replace them with the new OEM one.

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    Disable the Injector and keep the TH butterfly at WOT in preparation for the compression check.

    The compression check result was not too bad at all but bit all over the place suggesting some deviation in the valve clearance. As always, the absolute value is not important as it will change depending on the engine temperature, rpm and so on. It was measured while the engine was bit warm.
    #1:**9, #2:**8, #3:**1, #4:**4, #5:**6, #6:**8

    These should get closer each other after the service.

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    After this, just need to keep removing lots of parts and drain the coolant before replacing the TB and WP.

    More to follow later.

    Kaz

  6. #436
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    Due to the nice looking diffuser under the rear bumper, it is quite tricky to work around the rear bottom end of the car but so far, no big drama. Just keep draining the coolant.

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    Although I replaced all coolant hoses and related parts last year, I didnít want to gamble so decided to replace the O-rings and the washers at the drain/bleeder plugs and bolts.

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    Once all coolant has been drained, it is always best to carry out leak check on coolant system before removing the WP. This will confirm that at least there was no leakage before replacing the WP and if any leakage happened after replacing it, that would be very likely to be the WP seal issue.

    While carrying out the leak check, just keep removing all sorts of parts as much as possible before removing the trans/eng side mount bolts.

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    The rubber seal at the TB adjuster bolt. Quite often, I noticed that this seal rubber was missing after someone carried out the TB service. You better check yours as this is very important to prevent dust/moisture getting inside the TB cover. The part no. is 90401-634-000 if you need one.
    As the TB adjuster bolt is very rusty, this will be replaced with the new one.

  7. #437
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    One of the head cover fixing nut at the rear bank was in different colour. From the service history, someone replaced the head cover gasket in the past so probably dropped the original nut and couldnít find it.

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    Even for a low mileage NSX, the front bank head cover was very clean.

    On earlier models, the blow-by gas PCV is located at the front bank so it tends to show dark brown residue on this side. There was almost no sign of it so very clean and very impressed.

    Similar story on the front bank camshaft holder. Entire area was very clean. Looked very nice and healthy engine.

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    The outer surface of rear bank head cover was quite dirty as moisture/dust could fall onto it through the plstic vent in front of the boot lid.
    I think Iíll apply some black paint after cleaning and de-greasing it to make it look nice.]

    Although the outside was dirty, the internal camshaft holder area was very clean.


    More to follow.

  8. #438
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    Default

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    From time to time, I saw A/C idle pulley tension adjuster being twisted due to the wrong order of tightening the tension adjuster nut and locking nut. The pulley was nearly touching the adjuster. Will straighten it before assembly.

    The pulley bearing was still fine but eventually, it will require replacement.

    I replaced mine long time ago when I replaced my TB last time. I didnít notice any noise before the TB service but when I removed it from the car and spun it with my finger, I could hear faint metal noise so decided to replace it.

  9. #439
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    Default

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    In order to have better access to one of the TB cover bolt, the Oil cooler needs to be moved.

    Once all TB covers are removed, I always check the tension of TB and although the compression check was carried out at the start of the service, I also double check the current TB timing. This NSX looked to be never had the TB nor WP service. The tension and timing were fine.

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    Before going any further, it is best to deal with the head/valve covers as well as the TB Front, Rear, Lower covers. I prefer using small amount of liquid gasket to keep the rubber seal/gasket in place so it requires some time for the liquid gasket to cure and thus, you don't want to deal with them just before re-assembly.

    Cleaning the head/valve covers as I want to paint them in black on this NSX.

    More to follow.

    Kaz

  10. #440
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    Masking the non-painted area before applying thin coat of paint as you donít want to loose the original surface design.

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    After removing the TB Rear mid cover, I noticed a scratch mark by the camshaft pulley. Looks like when someone worked on the head/valve cover in the past for replacing the gasket, it was not installed properly and the top of the rear cover was not inserted to the recess of the head/valve cover properly.
    Unless you take out the engine, you must know the exact angle when putting back the rear bank head/valve cover. Otherwise, your gasket will get scratched, TB may get dirty or some of the installation wonít be perfect. The scratch was just the surface of the cover and decided to re-use it.

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    One of the guard plates (inner one) at the TB drive pulley shifted its position. Didnít cause any issues but something to look for during the service.

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