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Thread: Winter Chassis Re-fresh

  1. #61

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    Finally got the car back on the road this week. I had an issue with a water leak, which was a pinched seal between the thermostat manifold and the V bank pipe. It was a tight fit when I first re-assembled it, now I know why.

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    First drive to get the car MOT'd, this morning since top end rebuild. Car is noticeably smoother and more responsive, which is probably down to the cleaner, matched injectors and new correct spec spark plugs. Maybe the cleaning of the inlet manifold and attached parts also helps a tad.
    Wix

  2. #62

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    Haven't added any updates to this thread for a while, mainly as I didn't undertake anything worthy over the winter but I think I've finally got to the bottom of an annoying electrical issue, that I've had since owning the car and a more recent electrical issue.

    For three years of ownership, I've had the dash warning light come on, quite regularly, for error code 23, which is the front knock sensor. As I documented here in this thread, I replaced both knock sensors last year. Problem never went away. A few weeks ago having put the car back on the road for the summer, I started to investigate further. After a few emails to Kaz for advice etc. and doing various continuity & voltage checks at the two connector ends of the harness that connect the main ECU & knock sensor sub-harness, I found that the voltage to the front knock sensor was virtually non existent, 0.03v compared to the rear at 0.2v. The reading was the same at the ECU output. Conclusion was the ECU was faulty. Not sure where to go for repairing it, I asked a guy at work, who's the electrical specialist in one of workshops. He said he'd open it up and check the soldered joints, before I took it to a specialist ECU repairer.

    He couldn't find anything significant, just some small cracks around some of the joints, so he re-soldered them anyway. He also did the same for my cooling fan control unit, as I've had the odd time where the radiator fan wasn't coming on and the temperature gauge getting a little too high for comfort. Another particularly annoying issue, as I've replaced what I thought was the cause, the coolant sensor into the engine but two years later, the problem re-occurred.

    The good news is that both repairs seemed to have worked. The knock sensor warning hasn't come on in the last two journeys (it usually come on after 5 minutes of driving) and the cooling fan kicks in when it should.

    The annoying thing is, I changed both knock sensors unnecessarily, keeping what I thought was the only good one and throwing the faulty one away.

    I'm beginning to come to the conclusion, having had these issues and doing quite a bit of internet searching for NSX electrical issues, that the electrical units, that seem to give most issues, are mounted directly to the rear bulkhead panel and due to their ages & probable vibration issues, being closer to the engine, could be the cause of many annoying electrical problem, the main ones being, main relay, cooling fan ECU and main engine ECU issues. This is just my opinion but I shall certainly look to these areas for any future issues I might have.
    Wix

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    859

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    It is adviseable to take the electronics boards into account when solving problems in a car of that age/usual mileage. But the NSX is built very good and quite easy to solve compared to today's cars.

    I've once had a running on 5 cylinders problem in certain conditions only for about two years. Changed some of the parts you've mentioned above like engine coolant sensor, spark plugs etc. only to find out later that one of the lower injector seals got damaged during mounting the fuel rails some time back which caused a tiny air leak and messed up the air/fuel mixture in the corresponding cylinder. Problem solved, happy car, happy owner.

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by wixer View Post
    I'm beginning to come to the conclusion, having had these issues and doing quite a bit of internet searching for NSX electrical issues, that the electrical units, that seem to give most issues, are mounted directly to the rear bulkhead panel and due to their ages & probable vibration issues, being closer to the engine, could be the cause of many annoying electrical problem, the main ones being, main relay, cooling fan ECU and main engine ECU issues. This is just my opinion but I shall certainly look to these areas for any future issues I might have.
    Welcome back from hibernation Wixer ... addressing each of the boards and the main relay are actions most of us have or will complete, or in the habit of good preventative maintenance will be completing pro-actively.

    Hope you get them all sorted and continue enjoying your NSX
    Senninha

    'Too many manufacturers today are obsessed with lap times and power outputs at the expense of emotion and fun' Colin Goodwin

    S2 is signed by the NSX Project Leader Shigeru Uehara

  5. #65

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    As I counted my chickens a little too early in my last post/update and the dash light came on literally the following day from the post, I had to do a little more investigating, into the KS sensor issue.

    This time I decided to remove the pin from the ECU connector to check the wiring to the actual pin. A little fiddly to do, especially if your eyes are over half a century old but with various magnifying lenses I managed to remove the D4 pin from the plastic connector block using some jewellery screwdrivers. (The internet providing some useful info on removing pins from a Honda OBD 1 connector). I was expecting/hoping for a poor wiring joint, or even a small piece of dust but no, it was attached as it should be. There appeared to be nothing wrong with the pin at all.

    So the only thing I could conclude, after examining the pin, was either the small tension tabs perhaps being a little slack on the internal side of the pin, or they are broken and should attached at both of their ends, thus causing a poor electrical connection to the pins on the ECU. So very delicately I bent the tab slightly, so it would have more tension to the ECU PIN and snapped it back into the plastic connector housing.

    So this time, a week and half has passed and the warning light has not returned, so I actually do now believe I've solved the issue. Hopefully this bit of info may help others before they perhaps spend many hours and possibly money on trying to solve a re-occuring annoying electrical problem.

    Pic attached with an arrow pointing to the spring tab.
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    Wix

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